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Oil and Wildlife Don’t Mix


 

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“…One of the world’s great wildlife areas. The great diversity of vegetation and topography in this compact area, together with its relatively undisturbed condition, led to its selection as…one of our remaining wildlife and wilderness frontiers.” Fred Seaton, Secretary of Interior under President Eisenhowe

President Dwight D. Eisenhower wisely set aside much of the area now in the Arctic Refuge, including its coastal plain, to protect wildlife, wilderness and recreational values in 1960. Congress later enlarged the Refuge and clearly identified the conservation of “fish and wildlife populations and habitats in their natural diversity” as one of its major purposes. Installing a massive industrial complex for oil development on the Coastal Plain of the Refuge would devastate this pristine biological treasure. Once we allow drilling, there is no going back. Every member of Congress has a choice: uphold the will of the people and protect this exceptional place, or listen to industry and ruin a pristine landscape forever. Check out a report that assesses those claims by comparing them with the documented impact of past and present North Slope oil development. Click here to see the report “Broken Promises - the reality of big oil in America's arctic.” The Alaska Coalition has also commissioned a study comparing jobs produced by drilling in the Arctic Refuge with jobs produced by energy efficiency and alternative energy measures. To learn more, click here.